paglierino

We’re staying in Italy for July’s cheese, moving about 500 miles south to Salerno, where the Madaio family lives in their 3-towered castle. Casa Madaio has been aging cheese in their caves for 4 generations, and have kept their cheese business relatively small-scale, focusing on preservation of the land and tradition. We’ve had a number of their cheeses in the store. You might have tried fresh lemon-peppery Pantaleo, or Ficaccio, a small buffalo cheese wrapped in fig leaves, or their Rosso,  Cinerino, Canestrato, Caprotto, or maybe Mastorazio? (Obviously, we’re big fans of their cheese, which is consistently delicious). If not, then come in and try Paglierino! It’s just as fun to eat as it is to say! True to its name, which is Italian for straw, Paglierino has a dusty straw-colored rind, with a light inner paste that gets more golden as it gets closer to the rind. It is made from the milk of sheep who graze in the National park of Cilento and the Valley of Diano. The 3lb cylindrical wheels are aged 2-3 months, which is relatively young for a pecorino, leaving the inside more pliable and elastic than its more-aged counterparts. With a milky-sweet aroma, juicy flavors of brown butter, olives, and a low-key floral sheepynessPaglierino pairs well with a variety of treats- from quince paste to prosciutto, not forgetting wine, of course! Try a dry rose or a pinot noir.

paglierino2

And now for the kicker, it’s going to be just $14/lb!! (Usually $19!) The most inexpensive Cheese of the Month to date! Come in and get a little (or big) slice of this heavenly deal!

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